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Author Topic: Gust Locks, pt 2  (Read 1741 times)

Bruce Byerly

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Re: Gust Locks, pt 2
« Reply #15 on: April 02, 2023, 10:51:55 am »
Truthfully you donít need rudder to fly unless one quits.  I canít imagine a more simple and effective system than the internal and external locks on a Commander but as a pilot, I am capable of screwing anything up.  But thereís no way to properly taxi it with it in, so embarrassment is worst case to me anyway.

donv

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Re: Gust Locks, pt 2
« Reply #16 on: April 02, 2023, 07:26:06 pm »
Bruce is right. Furthermore both he and I have a lot of hours in Commanders, so not that surprising that it would happen to us. And, once you do it, you are much more careful about checking the rudders right before start!

Adam Frisch

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Re: Gust Locks, pt 2
« Reply #17 on: April 03, 2023, 01:42:13 pm »
I've never had or even seen an internal lock for my aircraft. Are they all the same, one size fits all?
Slumming it in the turboprop world - so you don't have to.

schrambow

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Re: Gust Locks, pt 2
« Reply #18 on: April 04, 2023, 10:23:09 pm »
I am not a Catholic and therefore have never been to a confession.
But here it goes.
I have flown 680fp's and 680flp for 30 plus years, plus some turbine's for the last 10 years.  Last late summer, i was diligently pre-flighting the 680flp in the hangar before my friend arrived to the hangar for a ride.  Was checking the engine oil and skydrol, and gear springs, etc...  my friend came in hanger during the middle of my preflight and very quickly distracted me from my preflight.  I pulled the plane out of the  hangar talking with him while pulling it out talking about everything under the sun.  Was a glorious VFR day. Didn't do a full deflection rudder kick both ways during the taxi and took off.  Got about 400 feet and something didn't feel right about the rudder at that time and it took me about 2 more seconds to realize just what I have done. I then pulled the power back to keep my speed to no more than 120 mph and stayed in the pattern and prayed that this external tail lock would NOT fly off and hit someone or something down on the ground. I could feel the lock still in during the downwind.  Apparently, i didn't keep tension on the rudder against the lock enough, as when i got out of the plane the rudder lock was gone.  My friend thanked me for the 2 minute ride and he thought it was a normal flight and i never told him what i just did. I was so disappointed to what i did and so embarrassed of myself with all of the years i have been flying, it took days and days for me to not think about this incident. The plane flew fine with it in, but if i lost an engine it would have been a huge problem, plus i have no idea where this tail lock ended up to this day. 
Side note, we lost a fuel cap 15 years ago at our home airport on take off as the copilot didn't do a good job screwing the cap down.  We found this cap finally 5 years ago in the grass off the side of the runway when a mowing crew hit it and damaged it a bit and wondered who's cap this was?  I have never not checked a cap again before a flight even if Jesus himself told me he put it on correctly.  Same with a tail lock since last summer, in fact i check it twice since last summer as i might have a compulsive disorder now because of it.
Just thought i would confess this to instill the importance of preflight duties to the young pilots in this forum and to future readers that could learn from my past mistakes.

JimC

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Re: Gust Locks, pt 2
« Reply #19 on: April 05, 2023, 11:54:42 am »
re: internal locks

This company makes one for the 500 series and one for turbines.

https://gustlock.com/default.asp

I have it on my 500. It doesn't reduce rudder movement to absolute zero, but it will certainly prevent it from banging into the stops. I'd guess net forces on the rudder bellcrank during a storm would be be less than forces applied during engine out practice.

I promise you that you will not take off (or even start engines) with this lock installed. You just can't miss it.
500B, B200

donv

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Re: Gust Locks, pt 2
« Reply #20 on: April 05, 2023, 01:36:42 pm »
The internal lock is good, and important, but it is not a substitute for the external lock. If you can only use one, use the external lock. And most Turbo Commanders that I see no longer have the internal lock at all... I'm unusual in that I still use mine and know how to use it.

Roy

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Re: Gust Locks, pt 2
« Reply #21 on: April 06, 2023, 04:57:11 pm »
Whole different failure/scenario... after one of the several high wind storms here in January.

N685TT, derelict at KRHV after hydraulic failure and going through the fence.

Badger

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Re: Gust Locks, pt 2
« Reply #22 on: April 20, 2023, 08:51:33 am »
I use both the internal and the external (rudder) gust locks religiously before I walk away from my 500B.  As a side point, I am also using a hangar ($$$) more often nowadays after my experience in Colorado Springs a year or so ago. 
Ed

donv

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Re: Gust Locks, pt 2
« Reply #23 on: April 24, 2023, 12:15:47 pm »
I was thinking about the comment about the external gust lock being left in, and it is interesting-- since I started flying my 980 12 years ago(!) I have changed my flow. Now, I get in the cockpit and remove the internal gust lock, and immediately check the rudders. This lets me know the rudder lock is removed.

In the old days, I used to not check the rudders until engines were started.

Bruce Byerly

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Re: Gust Locks, pt 2
« Reply #24 on: September 13, 2023, 02:27:36 pm »
Now all of this reminds me I need to get an internal lock for the Shrike, I donít think I have one Ö

donv

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Re: Gust Locks, pt 2
« Reply #25 on: September 13, 2023, 02:37:20 pm »
Is the internal lock for the Shrike similar to the turbines (with the rod between the rudder pedals and the column), or is it something different?

Bruce Byerly

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Re: Gust Locks, pt 2
« Reply #26 on: September 14, 2023, 07:29:34 pm »
Grabs rudder pedals same but more like an Aerostar grabbing the yoke but with the awesome threaded shaft adjuster like the turbines

donv

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Re: Gust Locks, pt 2
« Reply #27 on: October 25, 2023, 11:46:50 pm »
Bruce mentioned this up thread a bit: "Anyway, reminded me that the only real way of a pilot can check for integrity of the TQ tube is to leave the external lock in place and push on the pedals."

It's funny, I learned to do it the opposite way. Have the internal lock engaged, and remove the external gust lock then try to move the rudder with your hand. Easy to check on preflight.

Bruce Byerly

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Re: Gust Locks, pt 2
« Reply #28 on: October 27, 2023, 03:58:09 pm »
Bruce mentioned this up thread a bit: "Anyway, reminded me that the only real way of a pilot can check for integrity of the TQ tube is to leave the external lock in place and push on the pedals."

It's funny, I learned to do it the opposite way. Have the internal lock engaged, and remove the external gust lock then try to move the rudder with your hand. Easy to check on preflight.

Of course that works too lol