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Author Topic: Jean-Luc Pous for initial training  (Read 3264 times)

jbell2355

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Jean-Luc Pous for initial training
« on: February 23, 2024, 11:48:24 am »
The scheduling didn't work out with Barry Lane, but we found Jean Luc Pous through Aviation Training Management. He has a fascinating life history according to this article: https://twincommander.com/feb-march-2017/.

I'm curious if anyone has flown with him or has experience to share in working with Aviation Training Management.

donv

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Re: Jean-Luc Pous for initial training
« Reply #1 on: February 23, 2024, 07:28:07 pm »
Interesting... Let us know how it goes!

I'm not familiar with them, but it looks like the will train you in just about anything.

Rob

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Re: Jean-Luc Pous for initial training
« Reply #2 on: March 11, 2024, 02:56:17 am »
I would sure like to know how to contact Jean-Luc since he was a former owner of my 500A, N526RJ. I have several questions about the plane that he might have answers to. If anyone has his contact info I would appreciate it if you would pass it along to me.

jbell2355

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Re: Jean-Luc Pous for initial training
« Reply #3 on: March 15, 2024, 07:44:58 am »
We did our training with Jean-Luc this week and had a great experience. He is deeply knowledgeable about the airframe (he owns a 690B) and provided thorough training using an insurance-approved curriculum provided by Aviation Training Management (David Garvey).

This was my initial training. Before we went flying, Jean-Luc wanted to show us how when the Fuel/Hydraulic Shutoff switch was manipulated, we could see the arm on the hydraulic shutoff valves in the left gear well move from open to closed and back again. I turned the shutoff switch while the other pilot watched the valves, then we switched spots.

Next, we spent a full day draining 384 gallons of fuel from the airplane, accessing the fuel shutoff valves (inconveniently located in a sealed compartment under the center fuel tank in the baggage compartment), purging air from the fuel lines, attempting start after start, unable to get the left engine past about 50% RPM.

It turns out, that when I initially turned the shutoff switch I turned it the wrong direction without realizing it (the directional arrow placard is missing). The knob rotated on the post 180 degrees so that it indicated "on" when in the "off" position and vice versa. There is no flat spot or hole on the post to hold the knob in place. Once we realized this, our problem was solved by realigning the knob and tightening the allen screws.

Fun fact, the TPE331 will start with a closed fuel shutoff valve but won't go much above 50% RPM. I hope this info is helpful to someone else. It was a good learning experience for us all.

I replied to Rob with Jean-Luc's contact info.

donv

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Re: Jean-Luc Pous for initial training
« Reply #4 on: March 15, 2024, 11:51:24 am »
I wonder if he will do that demonstration in the future?

How did you do stalls? To the first indication?

jbell2355

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Re: Jean-Luc Pous for initial training
« Reply #5 on: March 15, 2024, 06:58:45 pm »
He added a few slides to his presentation related to the experience with the fuel hydraulic shutoff. If it happened again it would now be easy to diagnose and resolve. For a while, we thought that exercising the seldom used valve caused it to get stuck. Later, we thought that trying several restarts with a fuel starved high pressure pump burned up the $30,000 unit. At those points we were not pleased with our decision to turn that red knob.

jbell2355

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Re: Jean-Luc Pous for initial training
« Reply #6 on: March 15, 2024, 07:02:31 pm »
.and, yes, we recovered at first indication. Do you prefer taking it to the break?

donv

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Re: Jean-Luc Pous for initial training
« Reply #7 on: March 15, 2024, 08:32:48 pm »
No, in fact I would strongly recommend NOT taking the stall to the break. There is a significant accident history of Commanders doing air work, which I believe is related to the stall behavior.

The problem is that a wing often drops, and pretty severely, and when that happens you have to recover with rudder. If you don't get on it immediately, you can end up in a spin which, based on the accidents so far, is unrecoverable.

Even Bob Hoover decided that spinning the Shrike was a bad idea, after he scared himself.

donv

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Re: Jean-Luc Pous for initial training
« Reply #8 on: March 15, 2024, 08:35:05 pm »
This thread is worth reading on stall behavior:

http://www.twincommandergroup.com/index.php?topic=1472.0